Atwill and the Roman Conspiracy

Nowadays, whenever someone discusses the connections between the New Testament and the works of Josephus, many people immediately think of Joseph Atwill.  Actually, Atwill was not the first, many biblical scholars have studied the similarities between the two sets of works and concluded that the Gospels, all written in Greek around the end of the first and beginning of the second centuries, especially the books of Luke and Acts, borrow from the works of Jo...

Revealing the Man of Sin

“Let no man deceive you by any means: for that day [the Christian end times] shall not come, except there come a falling away first, and that man of sin be revealed, the son of perdition. Who opposeth and exalteth himself above all that is called God, or that is worshiped; so that he as God sitteth in the temple of God, shewing himself that he is God.” – 2 Thessalonians 2:3-4 The Christian last days will come as a falling away from Christianity together wi...

A Greek Lexicon

The Kingdom of God Josephus tells us a hundred times in his history that all of God’s favor had left the Jews and gone over to the Romans. “Josephus…  called to mind the dreams which he had dreamed in the night time, whereby God had signified to him beforehand both the future calamities of the Jews, and the events that concerned the Roman emperors…. he put up a secret prayer to God, and said, “Since it pleaseth thee, who hast ...

A Greek Tragedy

Εὐαγγέλιον: The Good News The four Gospels in the New Testament have long been argued to be a form of literature.  For one thing, they can’t be classified as true historical records since they were anonymous, written at an unknown time by unknown authors, and have, therefore, very little historical reliability.  But they are also written in a sort of poetic literary form called chiasmus from Greek χίασμα, “crossing”. It is a fairly comple...