Jesus Appears to the Disciples

“Now when Titus was come into this [upper] city, he admired not only some other places of strength in it, but particularly those strong towers which the tyrants in their mad conduct had relinquished; for when he saw their solid altitude, and the largeness of their several stones, and the exactness of their joints, as also how great was their breadth, and how extensive their length, he expressed himself after the manner following: “We have certainly had God for our assistant in this war, and it was no other than God who ejected the Jews out of these fortifications; for what could the hands of men or any machines do towards overthrowing these towers?” At which time he had many such discourses to his friends; he also let such go free as had been bound by the tyrants, and were left in the prisons. To conclude, when he entirely demolished the rest of the city, and overthrew its walls, he left these towers as a monument of his good fortune, which had proved his auxiliaries, and enabled him to take what could not otherwise have been taken by him. And now, since his soldiers were already quite tired with killing men, and yet there appeared to be a vast multitude still remaining alive, Caesar gave orders that they should kill none but those that were in arms, and opposed them, but should take the rest alive. But, together with those whom they had orders to slay, they slew the aged and the infirm…”

– Josephus, Wars of the Jews, Book VI, 9:1-2

And as they thus spake, Jesus himself stood in the midst of them, and saith unto them, Peace be unto you. But they were terrified and affrighted, and supposed that they had seen a spirit. And he said unto them, Why are ye troubled? and why do thoughts arise in your hearts? Behold my hands and my feet, that it is I myself: handle me, and see; for a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see me have. And when he had thus spoken, he shewed them his hands and his feet. And while they yet believed not for joy, and wondered, he said unto them, Have ye here any meat? And they gave him a piece of a broiled fish, and of an honeycomb. And he took it, and did eat before them.”

– Luke 24:36-43

This two stories are pretty much the same, because we know that Titus is the son of God {deified emperor Vespasian;} and “feasts” represent battles or slaughters.

“… they soon take their arms, and put themselves into motion, and make haste to a battle, as if it were to a feast…”

– Josephus, Wars of the Jews, Book IV, 4:1

Titus {Jesus;} is showing the people the remains of the fortresses around the temple {the body of Christ;} and told everyone that this was God’s doing.  Then he asks if there are any more rebels left to kill {any meat;} and they kill for him the aged {a broiled fish;} and the infirm {a honeycomb;}.

A piece of broiled fish represents the aged and a honeycomb represents the infirm which Jesus ate.

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